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Letter from the Editor

The Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History is a comprehensive digital research encyclopedia that describes Latin America’s peoples and experiences from pre-Columbian to contemporary times. Its essays make the region’s compelling past come alive by using the latest analyses, and by taking advantage of opportunities not available to traditional printed encyclopedias, such as incorporating sights and sounds, and offering links to original sources. It constitutes an inclusive, innovative, scholarly, and readable online resource for Latin American history available to everyone—scholars, researchers, students, teachers, and the public.

The entries are written by an international group of authors who are experts in the subjects they address. The editors have encouraged them to adopt creative, imaginative approaches to the past. Essays provide comprehensive views of the subject that engage readers by explaining how scholarship often shifts our knowledge of events, such as the independence movements in South America or the causes of the Nicaraguan revolution. Some topics feature debates by two or three historians about the most useful ways to comprehend subjects, always seeking to help readers understand the basic context and events of a subject, demonstrating how modes of thinking open up paths to deeper knowledge of Latin America. The contributions are vetted for accuracy by peer reviewers as well as a thirteen-member editorial board of distinguished U.S., European, and Latin American historians.

Using the evolving capabilities of the digital age, the ORE of Latin American History will keep changing, tracking new scholarship and expanding with new essays on topics of previously unrecognized significance. It stands as a dynamic encyclopedia reflecting how the best research and scholarship appropriates new methodologies, original modes of inquiry, and fresh reconsideration of interpretations, enlarging our understanding of past and present alike.

William H. Beezley
Editor in Chief of ORE of Latin American History
Professor of History at The University of Arizona