Editorial Board

 

Editor in Chief

WILLIAM BEEZLEY

is Professor of History at the University of Arizona, Director at Oaxaca (Mexico) Graduate Field School in Modern Mexican History, and Distinguished Visiting Professor at El Colegio de Mexico. His books include The Essential Mexico (Oxford University Press, 2013), Oxford History of Mexico, co-edited with Michael C. Meyer (Oxford University Press, 2nd Edition, 2010; Chinese translation, 2013), Mexico: The New Oxford World History Series (Oxford University Press, 2011), Latin American Popular Culture: An Introduction (Rowman & Littlefield 2nd ed, 2011), The Companion to Mexican History and Culture (Wiley-Blackwells, 2011), Mexico’s Crucial Century, 1810–1910: An Introduction, with Colin MacLachlan (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2010), and Judas at the Jockey Club and Other Episodes of Porfirian Mexico (Spanish translation, San Luis: Colegio de San Luis Potosí, 2010), as well as many other titles, articles, and reviews. Beezley also serves as series editor for Latin American Silhouettes (since 1989, Rowman & Littlefield) and Jaguar Books: Topics in Latin American Affairs (since 1991, Rowman & Littlefield). Professor Beezley has been a visiting professor of history at the University of Nebraska, Instituto de Estudios Ibero-Americanos, University of North Carolina, Guadalajara Summer School, University of Texas at Austin, University of British Columbia at Vancouver, La Universidad de Colima, and a Fulbright Senior Specialist at La Universidad Nacional, Bogota.

 

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Editorial Board

LAUREN (ROBIN) DERBY

is Associate Professor of Latin American history at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of The Dictator’s Seduction: Politics and the Popular Imagination in the Era of Trujillo (Duke University Press, 2009), which won the Gordon K. and Sybil Lewis award (CSA), the Bolton-Johnson Prize (CLAH/AHA), and received honorable mention for the Bryce Wood Book Award (LASA). She also co-edited Activating the Past: History and Memory in the Black Atlantic World (Cambridge Scholars Press, 2010) and The Dominican Republic Reader (Duke, 2014), and has written articles on the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Puerto Rico. She is a member of the editorial board of The Americas and Sociales (Dominican Republic).

 

 

BRENDA ELSEY

is Associate Professor of History at Hofstra University. Her research interests include the relationship between popular culture and politics in Latin America, gender, and social theory. She is the author of Citizens and Sportsmen: Fútbol and Politics in Twentieth-Century Chile (University of Texas, 2011), as well as several articles that address the political significance of sport, solidarity movements, and Pan-Americanism. Her current projects include a special issue of Radical History Review, “Historicizing the Politics and Pleasure of Sport.”

 

MARTIN NESVIG

is associate professor of history at the University of Miami. He earned a Ph.D. at Yale University in 2004 in Latin American and Iberian history and religion. He is a historian of colonial Mexico, Hispanic Catholicism, the Inquisition and the comparative Spanish empire. His interests lie in the contrast between proscriptive forms of ideology and behavior and everyday responses to those proscriptions. To that end he has studied inquisitional censorship, imperial politics and religious sociology. He is author of Ideology and Inquisition: The World of the Censors in Early Mexico (Yale 2009) and editor of three volumes on religious culture: Local Religion in Colonial Mexico (University of New Mexico 2006), Religious Culture in Modern Mexico (Rowman and Littlefield 2007) and Forgotten Franciscans (Pennsylvania State University 2011). Currently he is completing a book, Promiscuous Power, about everyday making and unmaking of empire in immediate post-contact western Mexico.

 

 

 

GUILLERMO PALACIOS

is professor of history at El Colegio de México. His published works include “The Social Sciences, Revolutionary Nationalism, and Interacademic Relations: Mexico and the United States, 1930–1940,” in Amelia M. Kiddle and Maria L. O. Muñoz, eds., Populism in Twentieth Century Mexico: The Presidencies of Lázaro Cárdenas and Luis Echeverría (University of Arizona Press, 2010). He organized the XIII Conference of Mexican, US, and Canadian Historians, held in October in Querétaro. More than 350 historians from 14 countries discussed papers on the theme “México and its Revolutions” in 86 sessions.

 

 

KAREN RACINE

is Associate Professor of Latin American History at the University of Guelph. She is the author of Francisco de Miranda: A Transatlantic Life in the Age of Revolution 1750–1816, and co-editor of two volumes on the Atlantic World in Rowman & Littlefield’s Human Tradition series and Strange Pilgrimages: Travel, Exile and National Identity in Latin America. Her articles have appeared in the Journal of Caribbean History, Historia Paedagogica, Journal of Genocide Research, Irish Migration Studies in Latin America, and several edited collections. She is finishing a study of Spanish Americans in London from 1808–1829 and a history of Latin American independence.

 

 

MONICA RANKIN

is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Texas at Dallas. An expert on Mexican diplomacy, gender, fashion, and identity in the 1940s, she specializes in the history of Mexico, Latin America, and U.S.-Latin American relations. She completed her Ph.D. in Latin American History from the University of Arizona in 2004. She is the author of ¡México, la patria!: Propaganda and Production during World War II (University of Nebraska Press, 2009); The History of Costa Rica (Greenwood Press, 2012); and Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture: The Search for National Identity, 1820s–1900 (Facts on File, 2010). She has also written several chapters and articles on various aspects of Mexican foreign policy, gender, and popular culture during World War II. She continues to examine popular culture, gender, and nationalism in 20th-century Mexico as well as issues of U.S.-Latin American relations in the 1940s.

 

 

GABRIELA SOTO LAVEAGA

is Associate Professor of Latin America, History of Medicine and Science at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her research interests include modern Latin America, the intersection of science and culture, public health, nationalism, and emerging citizenships. Soto Laveaga’s books and articles include Jungle Laboratories: Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of Global Steroids (Duke University Press, 2009), “Science and Public Health in the Century of Revolution,” in A Companion to Mexican History and Culture (John Wiley, 2011); and “Medicos, Hospitales y Servicios de Inteligencia” in Salud Colectiva 7 (1), January–April, 2011), as well as many more. Currently she is working on several projects including Sanitizing Revolt: Physicians Strikes and Public Health in Mexico, 1930s–1960s and Rural Health Care and Politics in 1970s Mexico.

 

 

JESSICA STITES MOR

teaches at University of British Columbia, Okanagan, and serves as the director of Latin American and Iberian Studies. She is author of Transition Cinema: Political Filmmaking and the Argentine Left since 1968 (Pittsburgh, 2012), co-editor of El Pasado que miramos (The Past We View, Paídos, 2009), and editor of Human Rights and Transnational Solidarity in Cold War Latin America (Wisconsin, 2013). She has also co-edited a special issue on South-South Solidarity for the Journal of Latin American and Iberian Research (2014). She serves on the executive board of the Canadian Latin American and Caribbean Studies Association, and has also served on the Council of Latin American History Teaching committee and the board of the Visual Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association. She has twice won Curriculum Innovation awards for her course Digital Media and History: Filmmaking for Scholars and Activists.

EMILY WAKILD

is Professor of History at Boise State University. Her research interests include the social and environmental history of revolution in Latin America, the comparative history of conservation and science, and cultural understandings of climate history. Wakild’s published works include Revolutionary Parks: Conservation, Social Justice, and Mexico’s National Parks (University of Arizona Press, 2011), which was awarded the Alfred B. Thomas Award for best book on a Latin American subject by the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies; the Charles A. Weyerhaueser Award for the best book in forest and conservation history by the Forest History Society; and the Conference on Latin American History’s Elinor Melville Award for the best book on Latin American environmental history. At present she is working on a comparative history of transnational conservation and scientific research in Amazonian and Patagonian South America.

 

 

CHARLES WALKER

is professor of history and director of the Hemispheric Institute on the Americas at the University of California, Davis. He teaches courses on all aspects of Latin American history as well as natural disasters, truth commissions, social movements, and sports and empire. His books include The Tupac Amaru Rebellion (Harvard University Press, 2014); Shaky Colonialism: The 1746 Earthquake-Tsunami in Lima, Peru and its Long Aftermath (Duke University Press, 2008); and Smoldering Ashes: Cuzco and the Transition from Colony to Republic, 1780–1840 (Duke University Press, 1999). He has also coedited several volumes in Peru, including a compilation of his essays, Diálogos con el Perú (FEP San Marcos, 2009), and introduced and translated with Carlos Aguirre and Willie Hiatt, Alberto Flores Galindo’s Buscando un Inca/In Search of an Inca (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Walker has held fellowships from the National Endowment of the Humanities, University of California (President’s Fellowship in the Humanities), American Council of Learned Societies, Social Science Research Council, the American Philosophical Society, the Tinker Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation. He serves on editorial boards in Chile, Peru, Spain, and the United States, and is the Andes editor for the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History.

 

 

STEPHEN WEBRE

is Garnie W. McGinty Professor of History and associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Louisiana Tech University. Professor Webre holds a PhD in Latin American history from Tulane University. His publications include José Napoleón Duarte and the Christian Democratic Party in Salvadoran Politics, 1960–1972 (1979), La sociedad colonial en Guatemala: estudios regionales y locales (1989), and La época colonial en Guatemala: estudios de historia social y cultural (with Robinson A. Herrera, 2014), plus many articles in academic journals, reference book entries, and book reviews. Professor Webre is a contributing editor of the Handbook of Latin American Studies and a corresponding member of the Academia de Geografía e Historia de Guatemala. His current research focuses on Spanish efforts to control the Central American frontier during the seventeenth century. He also maintains El Noticiero Centroamericanista, a blog dedicated to news of interest to specialists in the history and culture of Central American countries.

 

STEPHANIE WOOD

is the Director of the Wired Humanities Projects at the University of Oregon. She is the chief editor of a string of open-access digital projects relating to Mexican history, including the Mapas Project; the Early Nahuatl Library; the Nahuatl Dictionary (modern and early, with more than 70,000 regular users a year, over 36,000 searchable head words, with attestations of words in phrases pulled from manuscripts and translated to English and Spanish, and with added pictography and audio); and, the Age of Exploration maps by Europeans, with a special focus on the Western Hemisphere. She is the author of Transcending Conquest: Nahua Views of Spanish Colonial Mexico (University of Oklahoma Press, 2007), and has co-edited four anthologies. She regularly directs NEH Summer Institutes in Oaxaca, Mexico, and she is a Senior Fulbright Scholar.

 

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