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Potosí Mines  

Kris Lane

This article examines the long history of Potosí, Bolivia, home of the world’s most productive silver mines. The mines, discovered in 1545 and still active today, are discussed in terms of ... More

President Fernando Henrique Cardoso of Brazil  

Ted Goertzel

Online publication date:
Mar 2017
Fernando Henrique Cardoso (b. Rio de Janeiro, June 18, 1931) had an influential academic career before going into politics and becoming a senator, foreign minister, finance minister and ... More

The Promise and Peril of Gold Mining on Spanish and Portuguese Imperial Frontiers  

Heidi V. Scott

Online publication date:
Sep 2016
Between 1796 and 1809, an array of pro- and anti-mining discourses unfolded in response to a proposal to mine gold in the former Jesuit mission territories of Chiquitos. In the last years ... More

Public Health in Mexico, 1870–1943  

Claudia Agostoni

The prevention of communicable diseases, the containment of epidemic disorders, and the design of programs and the implementation of public health policies went through important ... More

The Public Sphere and Liberalism in Mexico: From the Mid-19th Century to the 1930s  

Pablo A. Piccato

Online publication date:
Aug 2016
Free speech was a greater concern for Mexican politicians, legislators, and intellectuals during the 19th century than electoral democracy. This can be easily verified by looking at the ... More

Pulque: A Pre-Columbian Alcoholic Beverage of Mexico  

David Yetman

Pulque, the alcoholic beverage of pre-Columbian highland Mesoamerica is the fermented derivative of aguamiel, the juice or sap of the agave known as agave pulquero—principally Agave ... More

Quechua  

Alan Durston

The Quechua languages are spoken today by several million people in the Andes Mountains and adjacent lowlands, from northwestern Argentina to southwestern Colombia. Quechua historical ... More

Railroads and the Mexican Imagination during the Porfiriato and Revolution  

Michael Matthews

Online publication date:
Jul 2017
Throughout the 19th and early 20th century, the Mexican populace demonstrated a fascination with the nation’s railroads. Newspapers, literature, poetry, music, and art focused their ... More

Rediscovering the Aztecs and Mayas: Field Exploration, Archaeological Exhibits, and National Museums  

Kevin M. Gosner

In the last decades of the 18th century, with the visit in 1784 of José Antonio Calderón to the Maya ruins at Palenque and the discovery in 1790 of the statue of Coatlicue and the Stone of ... More

REFLORA: A Virtual Way to Share Information about Brazilian Plants  

Daniela Zappi, Rafaela Campostrini Forzza, and E. Nic Lughadha

This is an advance summary of a forthcoming article in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History. Please check back later for the full article. ... More

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